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i think i am learning that accomplishment is all the same – for me…it requires endless hours of hard, not exciting, work alone….

my music has taught me this…writing the lyric, daily 2 hours of guitar practice, putting music to lyrics, editing, vocal practice, recording, editing, posting….the list is endless and it is pretty much me, myself and i doing all this…same with my day job…i suppose my brain is best at this…

even the performing is mainly alone…a little attention and connection during a good song performance (avg 15 mins) but then the next people come up…

most of the people where i play my music are drunk, on their phones and talk over the music…that’s the chicago music scene….

now, i love my music BECAUSE i get so much back form it …but it is exclusively intrinsic and internal rewards…and i kinda like that…

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One Goal – with my music – connect with strangers.  Immediately, (3-10 secs), and then for 3.5 mins.

Simple in concept, very hard to do.  Usually, I fail.  Once in awhile it works.  The “once in awhile” times, makes it all worth it.

I find the best way to do that is to dig really deep into my experience of things and then work, really, really hard to make a song and performance.  Far, far more work than “fun.”   (more…)

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i am constantly hearing new songs in my head and i feel a pressure to create them…so they stop rolling around in my brain…it’s like mental house cleaning..

also if i hear a story or a phrase/line comes to mind…and hooks me…same thing…it’s a new song…

 

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Pursuing literary immortality illuminates how the mind works

by Dec. 13, 2012

So the artist, musician or author’s challenge is to create a work that retains a freshness, according to Case Western Reserve University’s Michael Clune, in his new book, Writing Against Time (Stanford University Press). And, for the artist, musician or writer, creating this newness with each work is a race against “brain time.”

Clune explains how neurobiological forces designed for our survival naturally make interest in art fade. But the forces don’t stop artists from trying for timelessness. (more…)

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